Tomorrowland: Strategic Marketing? (Warning: Spoilers)

WARNING: THERE ARE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW. POSSIBLY MAJOR SPOILERS. DO NOT READ ON IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO SEE TOMORROWLAND SPOILERS. (I hope that’s enough of a warning…)

I was fortunate enough to see Disney’s Tomorrowland early on in it’s theatrical release. I went with my brother and cousin; the three of us are avid Disney fans and had been looking forward to the movie since the early trailers. (Also, my cousin is studying visual effects at SVA, so he was especially blown away.)

After the movie, still impressed, the three of us got to talking about the marketing aspect of the movie. One of the chief complaints I saw on social media is that the trailers didn’t divulge much about what the movie was actually about. I agreed with that — while I was excited for the movie, every trailer left me wondering (which I actually liked; I’m starting to get sick of trailers, especially theatrical trailers, giving away major plot points). 

But what if the vague-ness of the trailers was intentional?

— WARNING: THERE ARE DEFINITELY SPOILERS AHEAD. —

When Casey first touches the pin, she gets quick glimpses into another world. Though she doesn’t know it at the time, what she’s seeing is Tomorrowland. As the movie continues, Casey gets more and more into the world of Tomorrowland. But what she doesn’t realize until later in the movie is that what she’s seeing when she touches the pin is not actually Tomorrowland, but instead, a carefully crafted glimpse at this other world. She’s not getting all of the gritty details about what’s actually going on in Tomorrowland. 

Now, it’s been a few weeks since I’ve seen the movie. But I recall Frank saying something to Casey about how what she saw through the pin was not quite reality, but instead, a commercial to draw people into this other world. It’s intentionally perfect and crafted (and vague) to draw the people who receive pins in. 

This is just my (and my brother’s) theory. But what if Disney’s marketing team created intentionally vague trailers to mirror what Casey goes through in the movie? What if the trailers were created to draw us into this world without actually giving away much detail? 

It could just be that the trailers were hard to create because of the movie itself. But I like to think that Disney knows what it’s doing in the way of marketing, and knowing what I know about “Disney Details,” I like to think that this was actaully strategic marketing that mirrors the “marketing” (through the pin) of Tomorrowland in the movie.

I’m still seeing complaints and questions of “What is this movie actually about?” Well, from the trailers we can gather that this magical pin transports the main character to another world, this futuristic Tomorrowland. But for those of us who’ve seen the movie, we know it’s more than that. 

I don’t know about you folks, but the vagueness of the trailers actually drew me in more. I would have seen the movie regardless of the marketing, but after seeing the movie, I really do feel like there was some strategy in the lack of plot detail in the trailers.

What do you think?

  

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